Scars of the Past

Remains of 1897 Shipwreck still visible low tide – Higgins Beach, Maine

Remains of the 1897 Shipwreck of the coastal schooner the Howard V. Middleton, are still visible a hundred and fifteen years after. August 11, 1897, in dense fog and at full speed, the Middleton ran aground in the Atlantic Ocean on a ledge off  Higgins Beach, Scarborough, Maine.

The collision forced a fatal breach in the hull.

Its cargo of coal salvaged as were other ship board items along with personal the effects of the crew. But the ship itself was past saving. A September storm forced the wreck further onto the beach. It is still visible today along Higgins Beach at low tide.

The scars of the past stay long after the causal event.
see more pictures of Higgins Beach at my Flickr site – click here

New Orleans: Hurricane Isaac in the light of Hurricane Katrina.
As I write this, Hurricane Isaac has come ashore at New Orleans one of my very favorite Cities.

Folks in New Orleans, like many of us, bear scars of the past.

For New Orleans and much of the rest of the Country, the arrival of Hurricane Isaac is lived in the light of Katrina. Ironically Isaac made land fall seven years to the arrival of Katrina.
The scars of Katrina are many and run deep.

Our scars are many and run deep.

Like the folks in New Orleans, the scars of the past affect how we see ourselves and the world. Decisions are made in the light of memories and consequences of past situations.

Sometimes these are positive and helpful in the big picture. And sometimes not. Regardless, they are there.

For some of us, the trauma that produced our scars are due to the caprice of nature or happenings beyond our personal control.
• an accident
• illness
• birth condition
• behaviors of others
• result of work related/ life style related stress

For some of us, the trauma is directly related to our own past decisions and behaviors.

The question is not do we have scars?
It doesn’t take much living to develop wounds and experience traumas.

The question is how do we live with them?
The problem is not how to get rid of these marks of wear.
The challenge is what does it take to go forward in life with them.

In my older years, I’ve discovered that there is no magic way – no one answer.
I’ve learned through experience, however, we do it one day at a time in the light of the grace of our God and our friends.

Personally, I’ve adapted the three A’s of one of the recovery groups, as a working model for doing it one day at a time.

Aware – I realize that there are remains of the past happenings that at some of life’s low times shows themselves. Some times this is a quick realization – a sudden jolt. Some times it is dawns slowly.

Accept – this is the way it is. I’ve done what I can to “make amends.” I am responsible. In many ways, it is over and done. But in the course of life, we may be reminded of it. The “record” if you will is still there, perhaps officially and perhaps only in your memory. Perhaps we look at ourselves and are reminded regularly.

The truth is we can’t get rid of them not matter how much we want them gone. Acceptance then is the answer.

Adapt – scars are one of those givens in life. The key for me is to move beyond awareness and acceptance and adapt.

Wow – this gets long. I’ll save my thoughts on “adapting life’s givens” for another post.
I’ll end here.

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“Preacher Fish” Discovered

Dispatch – Scarborough Maine
“Preacher Fish” Discovered Along the Atlantic Seaboard

Adventure George of Rochester New York on his recent expedition to the Maine coast discovered “this most unusual and distinctive fish.” Found near the Pine Point Fisherman’s Co-op dock (Scarborough, Maine), George dubbed it the Preacher Fish. This was due to the large open mouth and large observant eyes. A.G. said, “Any of you who know preachers will recognize the resemblance. They are ready to talk and always looking for that next volunteer.”

When sought for information, the Maine Fisheries Department said, “It sounds like a fish tale to me.” When asked for his response, George said, “It sure looks like a head to me. Government often gets things backwards and all turned around.”

Before it could be sent for further study, the fish head was carried off by a large black-backed sea-gull.

End Dispatch

Summer Zucchini Cake

I’m not a baker.

I love to cook, but baking is another language. HOWEVER, there are two things I bake, other than out of the box items. One is a chocolate zucchini cake. The recipe follows along with a hint or two.

Try this recipe. I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised.

Makes 8-10 servings

Ingredients:

  • 3/4 C butter
  • 2 C sugar
  • 3 large eggs
  • 2 C grated zucchini
  • 1/2 C milk
  • 2 t vanilla
  • 2 C flour
  • 2 1/2 t baking powder
  • 1 1/2 t baking soda
  • 1 t cinnamon
  • 1 box chocolate instant pudding mix

Directions:

  • Preheat oven to 350º.
  • Grease 9 X 13 baking dish
  • Cream: butter/ sugar/eggs
  • Add and beat well: zucchini/ milk/ vanilla
  • Mix in rest of ingredients
  • Bake one hour or until baked through
  • Before serving sprinkle with confectionary sugar

Hike to the Past – Mason Lake

3 of our several Hikes in Jessup River Wild Forest – The Adirondack Forest Preserve – MARKED

set of images on my Flickr account are available
click here to view them

Sunday afternoon brother-in-law Rich led me into the Jessup River Wild Forest around Mason Lake.  Rich was a man on a mission. He sought the campsite of a previous bushwhack. On the trail and when questioned, he was last there in 1985. Let me figure this out. That was twenty-seven years ago, right?

“I’ll remember it when I see it.”

“I think this is the trail.”
(Well it is a deer trail but do they travel to the campsite?)

“That tree looks familiar.”

It seemed like forever. But we did reach the site – verified by the debris covered remains of the fire-pit. And Rich’s vision verified by exact placement: “this is where we washed dishes;” tents erected “here, and there.” I did draw the line at locating the latrine pits.

It was fun for me to share in Rich’s excitement. I enjoyed his stories of previous trips to the Mason Lake area. And yes, I took pictures of the forest and “things” in the forest as we walked to and fro the campsite.

Plus, the walk helped me greatly in my quest to regain my core body strength.

Jessup River Wild Forest is a defined part of the New York State’s Adirondack Forest Preserve.

What follows is from the Internet – website place and text below:
http://www.cnyhiking.com/JessupRiverWildForest.htm

The Jessup River Wild Forest area consists of 47,350 acres of State Forest Preserve lands in the towns of Arietta, Indian Lake, Lake Pleasant, and Wells in Hamilton County. This Wild Forest is bounded by NY 28 to the north and NY 30 in the southeast, as well as three wilderness areas: West Canada Lakes Wilderness to the west; Siamese Ponds Wilderness to the east, and Silver Lake Wilderness to the south.

The state lands in Jessup River Wild Forest border, or are in close proximity to, the communities of Indian Lake, Piseco, Speculator and Wells. NY 30 bisects Jessup River Wild Forest and serves as the main access corridor.

Many people enjoy hiking to the fire towers on Pillsbury and Snowy Mountains, snowmobiling between Piseco Lake and Indian Lake, canoeing on Fall Stream, or camping on Mason Lake. Hunting, fishing, and trapping are also popular activities throughout Jessup River Wild Forest particularly in and around Perkins Clearing, the Jessup River and the Miami River.

Sunset Color

Glory of Sunset seen over Lake Pleasant

Day is Done – Gone the Sun
On some days the setting of the sun is a glorious experience both in color and form.

The Passing of Days – The End of Life
A life passed is often marked by the colors of the life lived.

The beauty stays with us in our memory.

These thoughts wandered through my mind as I sat in the still beauty of this sunset over Lake Pleasant in the ancient Adirondack Mountains of New York State. The beach along the shore at Camp of the Woods in Speculator is one of my very favorite places. And on some days, witnesses spectacular sunsets.

George of Rochester
now in the mountains

see other images from this sunset on my Flickr account
click here

Barnyard Breakfast Sandwich By Sarah

A breakfast sandwich recipe sent to me by Sarah, of Sarah and Jim;  transplants both from urban New England to rural South Carolina. I mean rural as out in the boonies, rural.

Here is Sarah’s post with the recipe for Barnyard Breakfast Sandwich.
“I made Barnyard Grilled Cheese and Egg Sandwiches for Jim and me when we were burning (no firetrucks this time) our huge pile of yard debris out by the goat barn all day on Labor Day.

You fry the egg first (break yolk or cook hard so it won’t run when you bite into the sandwich) and make sure the whites are at least a bit crispy. Remove egg from pan and then make a grilled cheese sandwich but put the fried egg (or eggs, I used two eggs in Jim’s sandwich) in between the two slices of cheese while assembling the sandwich to cook. If you’re eating outdoors, wrap it in foil so you have a pouch to keep it warm and to keep it off any dirty unwashed hands.

Goes well with Gatorade. A good substitute for a fast food breakfast sandwich, and much tastier. You could add meat or hot sauce, too.”

Thanks Sarah.

End of Summer Vegetable Stew

01 Vegetable Stew, originally uploaded by Adventure George.

Wondering what to do with those end of summer vegetables. I mean the ones in great supply.

Why not make a vegetable stew?  Keep it thin and add dumplings.  Make it thick and serve over biscuits.

This is an old recipe out there in many places. Adapted by the cook210, also known as Adventure George and Photo George. Yeah, the writer of this blog.

Follow the Recipe Below
~ Ingredients ~
+ large sweet onion cut into strips
+ three medium zucchini cut in slices
+ 3 or 4 pounds stemmed, peeled & quartered tomatoes or 2 28 oz cans peeled whole Roma tomatoes
+ 1/2 cup chopped cabbage (optional)
+ sugar
+ salt
+ pepper
+ spinach (optional)

+ Directions +
~ Sauté onions in Olive Oil
~ Add chopped cabbage
~ Add sliced zucchini
~ Simmer until zucchini almost soft
~ Add tomatoes
~ Spice to taste
~ Stew mixture until zucchini soft

A follow directions omitting cabbage
A serve as a vegetable side dish

B add optional spinach
B add dumplings: cook according to recipe for the dumplings
B serve as vegetables and dumplings

C add optional spinach
C thicken with dark roux
C served vegetable stew over biscuits

Comments by thecook210
don’t add the spinach too early as spinach cook quickly and if over cooked looses form
no spices other than salt/ pepper/ sugar are necessary as vegetable carry the flavor
catch the photos that go along with this Recipe – click here to view them

Your comments, suggests, ideas welcome.